Point It At the Deck! With Ernest Rister Part 2 Point It At the Deck! With Ernest Rister Part 2
Zod concludes his conversation with the most knowledgeable and loquacious SOB on the net, Ernest Rister. Point It At the Deck! With Ernest Rister Part 2

Part two puny listeners! Welcome back to a brand new episode of POINT IT AT THE DECK! with your invulnerable host Zod with special guest, Ernest Rister, the most knowledgeable and loquacious SOB on the net as they are caught discussing, Steven Spielberg, the man Walt Disney, Song of the South, The Force Awakens, the once upon time luscious Haley Mills and the greatest Director that ever lived- JJ Abrams!

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Zod

A geek from the Midwest. I am about as corn fed American as you get and I love it. The 19 70s is still THE best decade of film- ever. If anyone, like me is inspired by that, you will do fine. Star Wars, Trek, Apes, Buffy, Avengers are on my geek radar among others...

  • Dee
  • ErnestRister

    Gone With the Wind (1939) had just passed Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937) as the highest grossing picture of all time — and decidedly so. Gone With the Wind was a freak phenomenon. Disney looked around for material, found the Joel Chandler Harris stories, thought they’d be great for animation. Story team tried to come up with a framing device to get in and out of the animated segments. The three animated sequences are fantastic. The live action sequences are like watching ice melt/paint dry/insert description of terribly boring activity here. It features racial stereotypes, but it isn’t a racist movie. Those are two different things.

  • Abe

    “It features racial stereotypes, but it isn’t a racist movie.” That’s too nuanced for modern day sensibilities.

  • Dee

    I have never seen the film.

  • ErnestRister

    Animated sequences are great, the live action is awful, even though it was shot by Gregg Toland. Bosley Crowther of the NY Times said the ratio of live action to animation was 3:1, and that was the same ratio of the film’s mediocrity to its charm. Best thing I’ve ever read about that movie, and he was exactly right. Song of the South is a crushing bore, with three great cartoons interspersed. For some reason, audiences turned out for it in droves.

  • ErnestRister

    Then they should stop watching the first seasons of The Simpsons.

  • I_am_better

    Ernest’s wealth of knowledge never ceases to amaze me

  • Abe

    Well, that would explain why I’ve seen topics and articles pop up of the Simpsons’ racism.

  • ErnestRister

    I don’t think there was any hate in The Simpsons, or any advocacy for racial supremacy or racial inadequacy. But yes, there are racial stereotypes. Again, as I said, it’s not the same thing as actual racism. People confalte the two, but its not the same thing. When it comes to Song of the South, the people who made it thought they were making a film celebrating the bonds between people, proving yet again that the road to hell is paved with good intentions.