Happy 68th Birthday, Stephen King: A Supernaughts Tribute Happy 68th Birthday, Stephen King: A Supernaughts Tribute
A belated tribute to Stephen King, who turned 68 this Monday. Four Supernaughts columnists write about the impact the "King of Horror" had on... Happy 68th Birthday, Stephen King: A Supernaughts Tribute

Stephen King, the master of modern horror literature, celebrated his 68th birthday this Monday. That’s why five Supernaughts columnists/King-fans joined forces to share what impact the writer had on their lives. This is an homage to Mr. King, the man, the myth, the legend.


IAB: King still got it

IAB, SN-columnist and podcaster (X-Files: Resist or Serve, BOPX) from Finland, remembers his first encounter with the master from Maine.

Hi, IAB here. In honor of Stephen King’s 68 birthday, I decided to reminisce a little bit about the times I first encountered the man’s work.

It was around the early 90’s – around the first year of what stands for High School in our country, so…that would make it circa 1992. I saw this paperback of “Salem’s Lot” in a bargain bin. The book was actually first published here in Finland as a hardback only in 1990 – so that’s quite a long ways from it’s original publication year of 1975. I guess we were sort of late bloomers in the King-mania. But I HAD heard about him by this point – and had seen some movies based on his novels…at least “The Shining”, “The Dead Zone” and “Misery”, probably a few more even. So I knew that this guy was a horror writer. And the word was, that he was supposed to be pretty damn good, too.

As I started reading this book and entered this world of novelist Ben Mears and his colorful group of friends slowly discovering the horrible truth about the Marsten House and it’s dark secret, I had a very physical reaction while reading; I actually felt the hair on the back of my head standing up at times. This was something of which like I had never felt while reading a book before. I actually read this book in one sitting – over the course of a day.

Needless to say, I was hooked. The good thing about this paperback-series was, that on the first page was a list of King’s works that this publishing house had put out by that time – which wasn’t a lot, but in the space of about the next year and a half, about dozen or so more paperbacks were released. So in that year and a half I spent what little money I had and grabbed those suckers the moment they appeared on the paperback-shelves; “Misery”, “The Dead Zone”, “Tommyknockers”, “The Shining”, “Carrie”, “Firestarter”, “Christine”, “The Stand”, “Pet Sematary” and also a bunch of short story-collections like “Night Shift”, “Skeleton Crew” and “Different Seasons”.

I read all of these books back to back during those years and cursed the moments when something ran out of print and I couldn’t find it(actually, I found the long-in-the-searching “IT” only last year!). The invention of online second-hand book stores has really helped in my quest of completing my collection of King’s works – including the “Richard Bachman” novels.

There are all kinds of disputes over the latter half of King’s publications being a bit more “hit and miss”, and yes – on some occasions those are valid, but King is and shall always remain my first real experience of horror literature. Just in this year, I’ve read “Revival” and “Joyland” and enjoyed the hell outta those – especially “Joyland”, which almost felt like a kind of long-lost extra chapter of “Different Seasons”. Which is a good thing. Definitely a good thing. The man’s still got it.

Joyland_fi_FI

The Finnish book cover for “Joyland”.


Tarmac: Forever thankful to King

The cunning wordsmith from Long Island, known as Tarmac, SN-columnist, occasional podcast guest and author himself, who is tellingly using a “Barlow” avatar, tells us what he appreciates most about the King of Horror. 

What I actually think of most about Stephen King—other than his great novels and short stories—is his undying love for writing and writers. He has pointed me to some great books that I normally would have never read, or even heard of. It is one of the main reasons I follow him on Twitter. I will forever be thankful for him pointing me to three great crime novels by an elusive shadow named Shane Stevens. King used a Stevens character—kingpin Alexis Machine—as Thad Beaumont’s fictional creation in The Dark Half. The author’s note in The Dark Half pointed me to three Steven’s books. Dead City,  a novel about low-level Jersey City Mobsters. It was in these pages that Machine surveyed his criminal empire. There was The Anvil Chorus about a French Police Inspector hunting a killer. Finally, By Reason of Insanity, which is a novel of such bloodcurdling, epic brilliance that I couldn’t recommend it enough. It makes Silence of the Lambs look like Kindergarten Cop. More recently, King pointed mentioned Richard Matheson’s brilliant WWII novel, The Beardless Warriors when Matheson passed away. Check that one out, as well.

Oh, and he wrote ‘Salem’s Lot. Happy Birthday Stephen!!!!

Dark HalfPaperback cover for “The Dark Half”.


Scott Colbert: King maybe saved my life

Scott Colbert, resident of Arizona, is SN-columnist, the busy, prolific mastermind behind the podcasts The Imaginarium and Jailbait and a published horror novel writer (Barb Wire Kisses), so he definitely has a unique perspective on King.

Stephen King celebrated his 68th birthday this past week. He’s published nearly the same number of novels, for the last 40 or so.  For many of us, it’s hard to remember a time when Stephen King wasn’t around. I know that’s true for me.

My first exposure to King was the paperback of Carrie. My sister had picked it up (snuggled in between the awful romance novels she was fond of), and one afternoon while snooping, I found it and took it back to my room. I want to say I was about ten. That sounds about right, I’ll go with that  When I read Carrie, some of it went over my head (tampons, vaginas and menstrual bleeding were a mystery to me), but the things I do remember, have stayed with me my entire life. The rain of rocks, the closet Carrie’s mother kept her in at times, the prom. And Mrs. Fucking White. She terrified me more than anything else.

Not long after that I saw a copy of The Shining (with the silver mirrored cover) Unlike Carrie though, The Shining didn’t do it for me. Not then at least. I found it boring, and not especially scary. In spite of that, I was at my local 7-11 one morning before school and on the paperback rack, next to the comics and magazines was a copy of The Stand. It was the gorgeous blue/black cover that attracted me, and in spite of its heft, I didn’t think twice and spent that week’s lunch money on it. From then on I’ve had a love affair with all his work.

the-shining

The silver foil cover edition of “The Shining”.

Like many love affairs though, I sometimes saw other people, or kicked him out (Tommyknockers was a bad time for us), but in the end I fell into his cold embrace and have stayed there through several Presidents, a couple of wars, and my own personal tragedies and triumphs. Many people know where they were when Kennedy was assassinated, or when the twin towers were blown from the landscape=I remember where I was each time a Stephen King book came out. I could go through them all, but that would take far more space than anyone would ever want to read. Trust me, when I say I can remember those moments. And for the most part I can remember where I bought them as well. This isn’t to brag, but to illustrate the importance that King has had in my life.

Funnily enough, even though I write horror, King wasn’t my inspiration to become a writer. I’ve learned a lot from his work, but he didn’t inspire me to write (that would have been the criminally underrated T.M. Wright, but that’s another story). What he did, was instil in me a love for reading. Not only horror, but fiction in general, non-fiction, cereal boxes, toilet paper wrappers, you name it, and I’ve probably read it. Long lasting friendships were formed with strangers around the world when online services such as Prodigy and AOL emerged.  We talked about his books, recommended other writers, and it felt like a secret club sometimes. With the advent of the internet, it was quite easy to expand that circle of friends. And while we may disagree on his work, no one can ever deny our passion for his novels. Even the later ones which everyone seems to slag off, I love (with only a couple of exceptions).

I mention all this, because King has made my life bearable at times when I thought it would kill me. He introduced me to characters that feel like old friends Beep Beep, Richie! But most of all he made me feel like I wasn’t alone in my love for the macabre.

Happy Birthday Stephen, and may you continue to brighten the world with your imagination, humanitarianism, and above all, the hope you offer in your work in spite of overwhelming odds.

TheStandCover6

The beautiful blue/black cover edition of “The Stand”.

Read up on Scott’s potentially controversial stance on Kubrick’s The Shining and his less surprising opinion on the Carrie remake, for which he has a few choice words left. He also reviewed the The Shining sequel Doctor Sleep.

MORE TRIBUTES ON THE NEXT PAGE, HIT THE BUTTON BELOW

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DetectiveDee

Detective Dee reviews movies and sometimes TV-series. He likes to indulge in the Asian cinema, exploitation flicks and the horror genre but is no stranger to Blockbuster culture either. He writes whatever he wants, but always aims to entertain.

  • CoolHandJuke

    my dad read all of Stephen King’s books, so i finished the Dark Tower books for him since he never got the chance. Eyes of the Dragon is also pretty sweet…

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    You should have told me you were doing this; I would happily have contributed a piece about King, as well!

  • This was great, guys. Once more into the breach…

  • Good Movies

    Wow that was marvelous. The highlight of my dreary Friday. Thank you gentlemen.

  • Good Movies

    I never forgot the sex scene in that one where the king uses a river metaphor to describe the act. Talking about Eyes of the Dragon.

  • CoolHandJuke

    King Roland’s wife was one hot piece of ace…

  • I remember a metaphor of an “iron” that has to be “forged”.

  • Thank you!

  • KilliK

    great tribute.

  • KilliK

    Cant Turd write quickly a small passage with his thoughts about King and insert it in the article? it’s not that he is gonna write a thesis.

  • That can be done, of course.

  • Thank you!

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    Great write-up, guys! First time I experienced King was my freshman year in high school. The school library had a bunch of King books and I checked out a couple, one being The Gunslinger, which was such a badass and intense book. Salem’s Lot went next, followed by It and The Stand. Anyone remember From a Buick 8? I went in thinking it was going to be like Christine, another one that is one of those great coming of age stories, but it turned out to be way more different and awesome. It was the first time reading a book where after I finished it, I had more questions than answers and I felt that had to come to my own conclusions. I would have been so down with contributing, Dee, but I understand that this was spur of the moment. Regardless, he’s the main reason why I’m into genre so much.

  • Look to Killik’s reply. You can send me a segment and I can insert it, if you want. I cannot promise I will do it today though, it’s 2:30 am here. I will pass the article around on Social Media on Sunday again.

  • Thank you! Sadly I have not read Buick. Damn, now I have to think of a sequel to this one if so many are interested in writing a contribution…

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    Ah dude, you should definitely read Buick. And don’t sweat it. There’s always next year!

  • I might do something about King movies in October. I send you a mail then.

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    I’m down with that!

  • Tarmac492.1

    whiskey tastes great tonight. The fall weather reminds me of King

  • Tarmac492.1

    thanks for letting me participate. So glad it was for a bday and not an obituary.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Like Bradbury,,Matheson. Asimov, Lovecraft before him, how many writers has King inspired?

  • Lisa 39

    The first King book I read was Salem’s lot, scared the shit out of me as a teen and got me hooked on everything Stephen King.

  • Humble AND positive!

  • Tarmac492.1

    Love it. I love the dirty little secrets aspect of the small town.

  • Tarmac492.1

    have a nice buzz going

  • Tarmac492.1

    im always down to talk 79 Salems Lot

  • Tarmac492.1

    i wasnt aware you slept

  • Tarmac492.1

    the last time I watched Creepshow the Lonesome Death of Jordy Verill struck me as bring fairly touching when I looked beneath the sad goofines of Jordy.

  • Tarmac492.1

    has anyone here read any shane stevens? Would love to rap about that.

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    I’ve sadly seen the sequel. Book was effin’ amazing though. Such a simple idea that I’m jealous that I’ve never thought of it before. But that’s King for you.

  • Lisa 39

    Small town secrets also came shining through in needful things and tommyknockers, good stuff. I love how he also writes about big cities (the stand) and stranded groups (the langoliers, the shining), he’s very versatile with settings.

    I enjoyed reading this birthday tribute, thank you for your contribution 🙂

  • Lisa 39

    A Salem’s lot sequel? No way!

  • Lisa 39

    Perfect!

  • Lisa 39

    You to? Yay!

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    It’s purty bad.

  • Tarmac492.1

    amazingly bad

  • Lisa 39

    O, thanks for the heads up!

  • Tarmac492.1

    terrible. directed by Larry Cohen

  • So damn childish too.

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    Really? Shoot, I kinda like his stuff.

  • Tarmac492.1

    hit or miss.

  • Lisa 39

    Did King write it?

  • Lisa 39

    Well that’s not good. Is that because of the director?

  • No, but you got me curious with that bit. I loved the mobster parts of The Dark Half. That book needed a better movie, sadly the movie is just okay.

  • They made up stuff like vampires drinking blood from cows…. I am not that big of a Cohen fan.

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    Nope but I am interested after hearing about him.

  • Lisa 39

    Vampires drinking blood from cows reminds me of the movie “the littlest vampire”, a kids movie. I expect vampires to rip necks to shreds adult style. Thanks for the warning, I’ll be sure to not watch it now.

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    Holy crap, it’s been a long time since I’ve seen that movie.

  • I loved the littlest vampire though!

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    😀

  • Have not seen the movie from the 90s, but I read the books and watched the old Tv-series.

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    Kewl, wish I coulda read the books. Couldn’t find em though.

  • Lisa 39

    It’s so darn cute! I haven’t seen it for a while either, maybe I’ll get #6 to hook up my vcr so I can watch it!

  • Out of print maybe?

  • Lisa 39

    Same here, almost as much as the Goonies! I swear we went through a period where those were the only movies my kids wanted to watch, and I was happy with that!

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    Well, there’s always thrift shops.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    “it’s not that he is gonna write a thesis.”

    Haha, I wouldn’t bet against it! 😉

  • Lisa 39

    (Pop some tags lol)

  • Tarmac492.1

    considering the firepower of the dark half movie, agreed. Hutton was miscast as Stark. Fine as Beaumont. Shane Stevens books might be tough to find. amazon is ur friend. By reason of insanity is epic. like it was written by shakespeare possessed by Ed Gein

  • Tarmac492.1

    Check him on Amazon. you can get one of those three. Prob from third party resellers

  • Lisa 39

    Who would you have picked to play stark?

  • Yeah he was too campy as Stark.

  • Tarmac492.1

    not scary or tough. A young Lee Marvin? Mel Gibson?

  • I would have picked someone like Liev Schreiber or Russell Crowe maybe. Someone who is a little more massive.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Lee Marvin? Mel Gibson??

  • Tarmac492.1

    nailed it with Liev. well done

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Thanks. Since Halloween is fast approaching, my thoughts have turned to writing about the horror genre and I was thinking about doing some sort of article on King anyway. But it might end up being more of a general retrospective or academic piece than personal reminiscences, so perhaps not suitable (and too long-winded) for the above.

  • Yeah you can still picture him as writer too.

  • Excellent. We will do a collective piece like this on SK movies, write me if you want to join.

  • Lisa 39

    Ooooh, Gibson can play crazy pretty good like in the first Lethal weapon movie, he would’ve been good and Lee Marvin is an excellent hard ass. Good choices tarmac.

  • Tarmac492.1

    absolutely. when u starting ur studio? perfect first project. Good subject matter for refn. for that matter, gosling is decent. he aint the actor liev is.

  • Tarmac492.1

    who do u think??

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    No. It’s just one of many bad film/TV sequels to adaptations of his novels (see also Pet Sematary 2, Firestarter Rekindled, Carrie 2: The Rage, and about two hundred follow ups to Children of the Corn) that he had nothing to do with. Although it’s interesting in theory to see how others continue his stories.

  • Lisa 39

    O man, Schreiber would’ve been amazing, he would have nailed it. Crowe would have been way better than Cusack also.

  • The adaptation is in need of today’s FX too.

  • Lisa 39

    Billy Zane would be my first choice, he plays crazy to well, have you seen dead calm?

  • Good Movies
  • Tarmac492.1

    ummm this is an inspired choice. That literate, condescending douchebag act would be great. brilliant idea!!

  • Lisa 39

    I believe that sometimes other people should keep their “visions” to themselves. I don’t know why any of them think they can even come close to writing like King. I’m glad he didn’t write that.

  • Lisa 39

    If only the asshats in Hollywood would listen to me! Thank you!

  • Sometimes they come back again for more

  • I’ve always thought that, always made me a little sad.

  • Tarmac492.1

    this might be cliched but im outside drinking and September by earth wind and fire on.

  • Agreed. One of my favorites as well.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    “Anyone remember From a Buick 8? I went in thinking it was going to be like Christine”

    Here’s something interesting about King’s body of work: I’ve noticed he’s written many mirror novels, where a basic premise or thematic content will be similar, but the story is then taken in completely different directions.

    Carrie – Firestarter
    ‘Salem’s Lot – Tommyknockers
    The Shining – Bag of Bones
    It – Dreamcatcher
    The Dark Half – Secret Window, Secret Garden
    Misery – Gerald’s Game
    The Stand – Desperation (or perhaps Cell). Of course, The Regulators was supposed to be a literal mirror novel of Desperation, too.

    I may be reaching, but it’s something to ponder. There are definitely a lot of themes of duality and “twinning” in his work (not least in The Talisman and The Dark Tower series), and his “Richard Bachman” persona is also a very direct manifestation of that.

    As an aside, I think many of his later, lesser known books are hideously underrated. I suspect part of that, at least, has to to with a lot of them not being adapted into movies (as of yet, anyway), as well as the fact he may have diverged from the obvious story expectations of his core audience from time to time, as you mentioned.

  • Return to Salem’s Lot I think.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Alexis Machine

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    And again…and again…and again…

  • Tarmac492.1

    Olyphant. Would give him a shot. Easygoing badass that he is. I would let him play Stark

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    I doubt even they think that; they’re just exploiting a brand name/title they have the rights to, and have no qualms about doing so. For shame.

  • Tarmac492.1

    interesting as always Mang. You should think about writing an article.

  • Tarmac492.1

    🙁

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Always thought it’d be fun if King actually wrote that novel within the novel into a real book, as it sounded pretty nasty and interesting.

    It says something that King can come up with a fake novel/character (I know the character name was taken from another author’s work, but you get the point) that is more intriguing than many other writers’ actual books.

  • Tarmac492.1

    i would love an academic piece from you. i am so incapable of such endevours which is why i love reading them.

  • Tarmac492.1

    wasnt that how dark half started? i think he was writing Machines Way??If u havent, I recommend searching out those Shane Stevens books.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Well, it’ll only be vaguely academic at best, if it even ends up being so. I’m not going to start analyzing King in the context of Marxist theory or feminism or Russian formalism and bore everyone to death like some blowhard English lit professor, heaven forbid!

  • Tarmac492.1

    the sparrows are flying again

  • Lisa 39

    Ooooh good one! What do you think about Ray liotta?

  • Lisa 39

    Is that a lot reference or guy code for something?

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Yeah, I think it was originally supposed to be another Bachman book until he was “outed”. Then it morphed into Dark Half.

    Haven’t read the Stevens books, but hopefully I will one day. There are still quite a few books of King’s own that I haven’t got around to yet, either.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Lance Henriksen.

  • Tarmac492.1

    word. dead city by stevens(alexis machine book) has a nice alice sweet alice communion scene. Best thing about stevens is u can only find bits and pieces about him. i love that shit.

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    I agree with Tarmac here, you really know your stuff on King.

  • Henry Rollins

  • Tarmac492.1

    props to darabont because he pictured kings everyman poetry best in shawshank with the recreation of the drinking beers after tarring the roof.,kings characters had such simple and profound things to say. Lehane has that too. A true gift.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Thanks, man.

  • Total Divas Recaps

    Ranked King Books Best to Worst – in my opinion (from what I have read)
    1. The Drawing of Three (DIDDA-CHIK? DADA-CHUM?)
    2. The Green Mile (The bad death of Edward Delacroix)
    3. It (the scene where the girl sees the clown in the bathroom mirror)
    4. The Talisman (the purply weird drink and the orphanage)
    5. Eyes of the Dragon (the bad guy)
    6. The Stand (well written)
    7. Dreamcatcher (shit weasels scared me to death)
    8. Skeleton Crew (the mist . . . . . . the storm . . . the tentacles . . . the ending . . . pruddy good)
    9. Night Shift (rats and a drifter looking for beer money)
    11. The Gunslinger (there are other worlds than these)
    12. The Waste land (crazy train and a city of the dead)
    13. Wizard and Glass (horses and castles)
    14. The Girl who Loved Tom Gordon (short, baseball, hard to remember)
    16. 11/22/63 (mother of GOD that’s a lot of pages sir)

  • Lisa 39

    Is he a musician?

  • Total Divas Recaps

    Books that I didn’t finish but still made a big impression on me for some reason: Dolores Claiborne (if there is one book I would want to reread it would be this one), Salem’s Lot (too scary honestly), Needful Things (too much sex for me), Bleak House (have tried numerous times to do this one but can’t get past the premise because I liked The Talisman so much), The Shining (started it but was too adult), probably some more stuff. Oh I also tried to read The Regulators and Desperation but they were way out of my league. The themes were just not for me. ANYWHOOOOOOOOO

  • Tarmac492.1

    sleep like the dead, teacher

  • Lisa 39

    I liked the movie but the book really scared the snot out of me, I never need to read it again because its permanently ingrained into my brain, so amazing.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    “Bleak House (have tried numerous times to do this one but can’t get past the premise because I liked The Talisman so much)”

    Yeah, I agree. What the hell did the legal reform of the chancery courts of Victorian London have to do with the tale of Jack Sawyer, anyway? I was expecting glass balls and wolf men, not that turgid old drivel!

  • Tarmac492.1

    i didnt love the regulators. loved desperation. paranoid: a chant. loved that shit

  • Tarmac492.1

    your thoughts on shirley jacksons The Haunting of hill House??

  • Tarmac492.1

    the last chapter of the gunslinger blew my mind..

  • Tarmac492.1

    maybe vincent gallo for george stark?

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Never read it, only seen the film. I think.

  • KilliK

    at least we ll get sooner your take on King, than Asimov’s special tribute article which he had promised. what happened to him, anyway?

  • KilliK

    Wasnt Tobe Hooper supposed to adapt Buick 8 into a movie? He also did King’s The Mangler in the 90s.

  • KilliK

    all the YA writers? 😛

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Asimov’s article on, er…Asimov probably won’t be worth reading. I don’t want to badmouth the guy, but I’m suspicious he’s been stringing us along and isn’t that well informed on that particular author, despite appropriating his name and seeming to act as a spokesman for him and his atheistic, logical and humanitarian ideas.

    I’m deducing this from Asimov’s (our one) previous comments where he claimed he’d only read the first Foundation novel and didn’t want to read any more because, in his opinion, it diverged from the story and got away from its charm. Not only is that series a cornerstone of Asimov’s fiction work and a medium for his ideas and philosophies about humanity’s future, and essential to any discussion thereof, but no true fan would say such a ludicrous thing about the books because it makes absolutely no sense.

    Some fans might make a distinction between the early Foundation books and the later ones Isaac Asimov wrote from the eighties on, but the earlier books are nearly always taken as a complete trilogy (it was voted a retrospective Hugo award for best all-time science-fiction series) and all three novels – including the first – are really just loose “fix-up” novels cobbled together from shorter novellas published in forties science fiction magazines. Each novella/short piece is a complete story in and of itself, and thus you can’t make any meaningful distinction between the first collected book and the other two. It’s really nine stories that nonetheless comprise a complete narrative built around the same themes (that of predicting future events through mathematics and mass psychology).

    So, I am afraid to say our friend may have been bullshitting us all along. It’s similar to his always going to bat for Star Trek on AICN, yet claiming, when questioned, that he wasn’t even a Star Trek fan and hasn’t watched much of TNG.

    Maybe I will do the piece on Asimov’s Foundation and robot books, instead.

  • Dr. Geiszler, Kaijuologist

    Huh. In this case I’m kinda glad he didn’t. Woulda preferred another director. Nothing against the man.

  • KilliK

    I wouldnt mind if you wrote an article about Asimov. do it, mate, if you have the time and the desire.

  • ponyboy_360

    Great idea for an article Dee.
    As I have,
    “Get Busy Livin’
    Or Get Busy Dyin'”.
    Tattooed on my inner left wrist.
    Yes, I’m a fan.
    By FAR my FAVOURITE King, is actually a
    Richard Bachman book.
    “The Long Walk”.
    #47 Garraty & #88 Stebbins.
    Two of my all time favourite King characters.
    I will never forget those names.
    I had already read a bunch of King prior to
    “The Long Walk”.
    But that story knocked me on my ass.
    From the moment I put it down.
    I re-read it.
    I had never done that before.
    I’ve always said that I wanted
    “The Long Walk” to be my first film.
    Wanted to get the rights for a dollar, & all that shit, back in the day.
    I still would shoot it like a PTA film now, if I could.
    I loved the simple, yet heartbreaking premise.
    I find it extremely cinematic.
    I have numerous paperbacks of this, with all the dialogue & action hi-lighted.
    There were no “reality” shows when I read this as a kid.
    This structure seemed amazing to a young me.
    Walk & beat everyone.
    & you win/receive whatever you want.
    Stebbins!!!!!!!!!
    Fucking Love It!

    My favourite Stephen King Novel.
    “It”.
    Easily.
    I enjoyed each of your choices.
    Maybe someone already mentioned
    “The Long Walk”.
    I just got home, haven’t checked.
    Anyway.
    Good job Dee.
    Peace.

  • Thank you! Yes, I read the “Long Walk”, it is quite a book, like a slow, gruelling version of “Running Man”. “Rage” was also quite good, but King let it fall out of print on purpose.

  • yes but he acts too

  • Tarmac492.1

    Liotta would be great. That fucking stare would save them on makeup.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Maybe the coolest opening paragraph ever.

  • Tarmac492.1

    dark half If I remember correctly.

  • Tarmac492.1

    The Mangler was a nasty little short story. A good one.

  • Lisa 39

    Ok, I’m a dork and I was tired last night. Lotr is the eagles not the sparrows 🙂

  • Lisa 39

    I never want that man to look at me like that, I’d probably pee in my pants.

  • Lisa 39

    I don’t know that I’ve seen anything he’s in, I’ll have to google him.

  • CreepyThinMan

    King’s best novels are his early ones when he was economic and to the point. I lost
    interest when his books started getting to the size where they could be used to
    bludgeon a person to death. I think his best material is his short stories
    along with the Green Mile when it was released as a series of novellas. His
    last novel I read was Joyland and I think that if you took out the serial
    killer angle, you’d have a beautiful story of youthful nostalgia. That’s what I
    loved about the film adaptation of Hearts in Atlantis which would have been a
    classic if not for the modern day prologue/epilogue tacked on which the movie
    didn’t need.

    Here’s the thing about movies based upon his work. You can’t simply translate
    them directly to the screen because, frankly, the novels are a bit schlocky.
    You notice that in the TV adaptations like IT and The Stand which are
    considered more “faithful” but don’t transcend the material the way
    that Kubrick’s The Shining does. I’m not a big fan of Kubrick but I saw his
    movie first and then read the novel later which disappointed me because the
    book had hedge animals and fire hoses attacking people while the film was more
    moody, atmospheric and emphasized the insidious way the hotel worked on Jack
    Torrance’s weaknesses while his death in the hedge maze was masterful given the
    way it made literal Jack lost and dying in the labyrinth of his own insanity. I
    always thought it was telling that King seemed to prefer The Outer Limits to
    The Twilight Zone…..

    I just wish Stephen was a bit more discriminate about who adapted his work. I
    still can’t believe that Steven Spielberg has NEVER made a movie based on a
    King book?!? I fucking wish to CEILING CAT ALMIGHTY that the Berg had made a
    STAND trilogy back in the late 80’s, shot all at once ala The Lord of the
    Rings. There have been about a dozen fine movies (Carrie, Creepshow, The
    Shining, Pet Semetary, Christine, The Shawshank Redemption, Stand By Me,
    Misery, The Green Mile, Cat’s Eye, The Dead Zone, The Running Man, The Mist)
    mined from Horrors most famous writer but King never seemed to care about
    maintaining quality which makes it feel as though his stories captured the zeitgeist
    and why soo many talented Directors were drawn to them. King has always
    maintained that he’s the “Big Mac of Horror” but, unlike disposable junk food,
    there’s a underlying finesse (to the concepts, structures and characters) that
    elevates his material thus giving it that feeling of someone trying to
    entertain you while not talking down to you which is why King has something of
    a universal appeal. King famously derided Kubricks The Shining as being self-important and pretentious but then Stephen wrote and Directed Maximum Overdrive which proved that he knows fuck all about cinematic Horror.

    But the last truly excellent Horror movie derived from SK is Apt Pupil. That
    movie has been strangely forgotten but I think it’s Bryan Singers best film.
    What makes it fantastic is that there is nothing supernatural, just simple, basic
    human evil and how the allure of fascism can corrupt an ALL AMERICAN TEENAGE
    BOY (TM) like Todd Bowden who discovers a Nazi war criminal, named Kurt
    Dussander, hiding amongst the white picket fences of suburban Americana, who he
    blackmails into revealing what it felt like to have such power.

    I love the way this arrogant little shit thinks he has the upper hand on this
    old man while Dussander tells him of his time during WWII until this perverse
    fixation affects Todd’s grades at which point Kurt turns the tables on the boy
    and uses fear of exposure (about how Bowden’s known of a Nazi War Criminal, did
    nothing about it and how that would taint the rest of Todd’s life) to motivate
    his young pupil to pull his grades up.

    The novella is great but Singer’s movie is better because in the original story
    Bowden goes insane and starts shooting people, driving on a highway, with a
    rifle until the pigs take him down. The film version has Bowden’s secret
    discovered by Ed French (Todd’s guidance counselor who met with Bowden and
    Dussander, where he posed as Todd’s grandfather to assure French that the young
    man’s academic slide was due to trouble at home with his parents and that he
    would help his “grandson” pull through) who threatens to go public
    with Todd’s secret before the teen blackmails French into silence by saying
    that he’ll make false sexual molestation accusations against him thus destroying
    Ed’s career. Lies and fear are his tool and trade now as Todd Bowden has
    graduated from high school and finished his apprenticeship under Dussander,
    proving himself to be an Apt Pupil.

    Like I said, an excellent movie unfortunately marred by the controversy
    surrounding charges made against Bryan Singer, who was accused of inappropriate
    sexual conduct, specifically while shooting a scene where Todd (Brad Renfro) is
    in a locker room shower with other boys. Given that this wasn’t the last time
    these types of accusations have been aimed at Singer (to say nothing about his
    friendship with Return of the Living Dead actor Brain Peck who became an acting
    coach for children and himself served 16 months in prison for sexually abusing
    a young boy http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3115792/Pedophile-X-Men-actor-convicted-sexually-abusing-Nickelodeon-child-star-working-underage-kids.html )
    I’d be willing to say that where there’s smoke there’s fire although Singer
    isn’t what you’d call “flaming”.

    Apt Pupil also has the distinction of being the second, and LAST, good movie that fat fuck Hollywood Producer scum Donny “Two-chins” Murphy had anything to do with as he worked with his old USC (USC School of Cinematic Arts in California) classmate Singer. I wonder if film was the only interest these two shared although, to be fair,
    since Murphy slimed his way into “Producing” the Transformers movies, the only
    cock we have evidence of him sucking is Michael Bay’s although I’ve heard a
    rumor that Two-Chins’ wife-beard keeps her clit down with duct tape. However, Murphy
    did Produce Bully (2001) which was Directed by Larry Clark who is apparently
    straight despite his films’ (Kids, Another Day in Paradise, Ken Park) fixation
    on teenage boys and homoeroticism. But I’m sure this is all coincidental……

    Anywho, getting back to the subject at hand, Stephen King is easily the world’s
    most famous author whose meteoric rise during the 70’s and 80’s helped to make Horror peak during that era (as I’ve written about before here http://247365hatemachine.blogspot.ca/2015/02/the-horror-genre-is-fucking-dead-to.html) and I will forever be grateful for his contribution to my most beloved genre. I
    just hope that one day we can get a movie out of “The Breathing Method”, the
    fourth and final story from his collection ‘Different Seasons’, which has yet
    to be adapted while the other three have been made into wonderful movies ([Rita
    Hayworth and] The Shawshank Redemption, Stand By Me [originally titled The
    Body] and the before mentioned Apt Pupil) although the prospect of a film
    featuring a group of men sitting in a Gentlemen’s Club and telling a story
    about the headless body of a pregnant women wheezing through its severed esophagus as it gives birth would have Feminists dislodging their tampons, setting them alight and flinging them at the screen in protest while it would make for a
    challenging project for Steven Spielberg if he wasn’t a GIGANTIC FUCKING
    PUSSY!!!FACT!!!

  • Good rant, Creepy.

  • I agree about King getting a little too chatty later on. Just compare the dialogue of the old “Salem’s Lot” movie and the new version of 2004.

  • CoolHandJuke

    Number 2 of DT was a dredge for me. Didn’t care much for wizards and glass either. Thought 3 was the best and then Gunslinger. The end ones were just blah

  • Tarmac492.1

    I think Spielberg would have done a decent Shining as well. He could have had all the scares and still given it the somewhat happy ending it had with Olive Oyl and the creepy kid getting away from Crazy Jack. Would he have bettered Kubrick’s version–perhaps not, but I believe The Shining was right in Spielberg’s wheelhouse. Duel was a very Kinglike story which makes sense in a reverse way as Matheson wrote Duel and was a great influence on King,

  • Tarmac492.1

    Cain Rose Up was another one of those nasty stories.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Great Book. King quote on cover.

  • CreepyThinMan

    Spielberg and King’s work of the late 70’s to the late 80’s was soo simpatico in its working-class-people-encounter-strange-shit outlook, to say nothing about the heavy nostalgia streak they both share, that it boggles the mind that they never worked together on anything!?!FACT!!!

  • Tarmac492.1

    Thomas Bishop would eat Hannibal Lector as a pre-workout energy booster. Perhaps the son of Caryl Chessman? Read and find out.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Sadly. Turd and I were talking about that this week in another thread. They flirted with each other like two fat and horny office workers who are married to even fatter spouses, but they never really fucked or even fingerblasted each other in their hairy asses. Our loss.

  • Tarmac492.1

    For some reason when I read this, I think of it in eerie claymation with animals.

  • Tarmac492.1

    ” Cut him,” Machine said, “Cut him while I stand here and watch. I want to see the blood flow. Don’t make me tell you twice.”
    -Machine’s Way
    by George Stark

  • CreepyThinMan

    I still wish that George A. Romero and King could get back together and do another Creepshow. It would be AWESOME to see what they could do with todays technology!!!FACT!!!

  • Tarmac492.1

    I remember reading pet ‘semetary and when Louis Creed is carrying his son’s body to bury it in the burial ground–walking through the forest at night..? Fuck, what brilliant writing. One of the most unnerving things I have ever read this side of a letter from the IRS telling you that you owe them more. Great call on The Long Walk.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Cronenberg’s adaption of The Dead Zone was all sorts of great. Captured the novel quite nicely, even with its changes. “the ICE is going to break,” Walken voice.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Man my head is fuzzy today. Hadnt drank in a while(like over a month) but it is PDW here in the northeast and it was just so nice out.I had to imbibe. It sure was fun coming home and finishing off the night with some drinks and this thread..

  • you got mail

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    As I’ve argued elsewhere, all this is true enough, but King nonetheless displayed a penchant for disturbing sex and violence that Spielberg lacked.

    Sure, I can imagine the ‘Berg directing a version of IT in the eighties with great child performances, but not one where the clown rips off a kid’s arm or transforms into a rotting wino that solicits nickels and dimes in return for “sucking ya dick!”

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Amen!

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Lol @ Don “Two Chins” Murphy! I remember that asshole going after you back in the AICN days.

  • Tarmac492.1

    I think a younger Michael Keaton would have been good as Stark. Eddie Murphy?

  • Lisa 39

    Pdw? I’m in the northeast also, of Ohio!

  • Tarmac492.1

    Maybe I do an article. PDW–Perfect Drinking Weather. Usually from 9/21-11/21. Not too cold, not too hot. Beautiful.

  • Lisa 39

    Tonight at 8 I will be watching “misery”, yay!

  • Lisa 39

    Ooooh, perfect drinking weather, got it. Yeah it is pretty nice out now but I really enjoyed the summer while I could. I hope your fuzzy head feels better soon 🙂

  • I don’t know. I picture Stark as a burly type with a world-weary face. He is a gangster who became a writer in the book.

  • That’s been my all time favorite. Book and movie.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Michael Keaton was a gangster in Johnny Dangerously.

  • He is too wiry for the way I picture Stark.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Joe Piscopo?

  • Tarmac492.1

    They are both great. I like Stillson in the book better, although martin Sheen is phenomenal in the film. They are both very tragic stories. A pretty emotional work from King.

  • CreepyThinMan

    YOU DIRTY-BIRDY!!!FACT!!!

  • ponyboy_360

    I remember reading that scene.
    Harrowing.
    Cheers.

  • ponyboy_360

    Yes, “Rage” was read before
    “The Long Walk”.
    In my hard cover edition.
    That certainly had a huge impact as well.
    Again, when I read this.
    There were NO school shootings, to my knowledge.
    Great story about the jocks, geeks, pretty girls & the outsiders.
    Obviously, when King heard his book was being used as a sort of “Catcher In The Rye”.
    He immediately pulled it of the shelves.
    Completely understandable.
    That book hits a nerve.
    I think everyone can relate to at least one character.
    A fucked up
    “The Breakfast Club”, in my opinion.
    Cheers.

  • ponyboy_360

    Great read.
    “Apt Pupil”, is above
    “The Usual Suspects” for me, in Singers filmography.
    I loved the novella.
    Another brilliant premise.
    You’re absolutely correct on the ending of the film being more of a gut punch, than the novella.
    The bravado that Renfro displayed towards Schwimmer, in the final scene of the film.
    Made me audibly go, “holy fuck”.
    When I saw it in the theatre.
    I’m surprised nobody has mentioned this.
    As an aside, in regards to your article.
    I do own all of Larry Clark’s films.
    “America History X”, & “Kids” made me a fan.
    Again, your article was a great & informative read.
    Peace.

  • ponyboy_360
  • Tarmac492.1

    Brad Renfro had talent. Bully is a fave of mine. Disturbing, disheartening and fascinating.

  • ponyboy_360

    I LOVE how everyone can remember
    the character names, from Kings work.
    I’ve always said, he creates characters, where it is impossible to forget their names.
    I think everyone who has posted.
    Has mentioned the character names from their favourite King books.
    They stay with you.
    Again.
    Great job Dee!
    We have to get ready to go see,
    Denis Villeneuve’s.
    “Sicario”.
    Have a great weekend.
    Peace Out.

  • ponyboy_360

    That’s an owner as well.
    That true story was fucked up.
    Renfro was amazing, his character was so conflicted.
    No R.I.P. for him at the Oscars.
    Another great film T.
    We seem to watch the exact same films.
    Props, homie.
    I have to bounce.
    Have a good one!
    Peace.

  • Lisa 39

    I love her so much, such a wonderful actress! She rocked Delores Claiborne!

  • Thank you! Yeah I looked the names up again to be safe, but I had them all correctly in mind.

  • CreepyThinMan

    M-O-O-N, that spells FUCK YOU!!!FACT!!!

  • CreepyThinMan

    You know, I totally forgot about that movie. Not great but underrated just like Needful Things!!!FACT!!!

  • Toruk_Makto

    Nice. Good stuff. Love the King.

  • Lisa 39

    Another good one is golden years, a bit cheesy but definitely a quality story. I never read the book but I thoroughly enjoy the movie.

  • Tarmac492.1

    The dead father in the mirror was good stuff. Real good stuff.

  • Stalkeye
  • Stalkeye

    That was fun. Holy Shite, I had no idea that one of the actors from ROTLD is a Pedo!! Well, he was my least favorite character from that Movie anyway.
    To the gallows with that Cocksucker and Singer!

  • Stalkeye
  • You too, mang!

  • Stalkeye

    Thanks, S but I was just answering the call. (;’
    I have a few things ready for “Shocktober”.

  • That’s good to hear!

  • Tarmac492.1

    loved the shotgun blast in the movie. It was different.

  • Stalkeye

    Classic. I need to revisit Creepshow while it’s still available on my streaming apps.

  • Tarmac492.1

    You can get in on Netflix, right? Day of the Dead is also available. Also NOTLD that is always on TV though. I still have to go through my FIOS as I dont know what channels I have. Caught up on Ray Donovan and watched the finale. What did you think?

  • Stalkeye

    Damn. I went to bed too early to catch Ray Donovan but the missus and I will catch the finale tonight. I watched fear the Snoring dead to see if there were any improvements to the series and it’s more or less the usual tropes. (i.e. The ol contingency plan and the Military being Dicks.)
    Rueben Blades’ character is more interesting than the other protagonists. Shit if he would also sing in the episodes as well. XD

  • Stalkeye
  • franks_television

    I’ve enjoyed King’s recent stuff. Revival, Mr. Mercedes and the sequel, 11/22/63, Doctor Sleep, Joyland. I think he had kind of a slump in the 2000s but he seems to have made something of a comeback from that. It’s not all fantastic, but I’d at least call it good.

  • His slump may partly be due to the accident he was involved in.

  • franks_television

    That may be true. I know it made him rush the last Dark Tower books.

  • Stalkeye

    My Favorite scene from The Dead Zone…

    Nice foreshadowing of those Fanatical Christian Conservative Nutbags!

    Martin Sheen, FTMFW!

  • Full Frontal Throttle

    I agree, glad Hooper stayed away. He would have ruined it