Can You Dig It?!!?, Part 6: “48 Hrs.” (1982) Can You Dig It?!!?, Part 6: “48 Hrs.” (1982)
In his Best of Walter Hill-series, IAB takes on "48 Hrs." - a film that started many things Can You Dig It?!!?, Part 6: “48 Hrs.” (1982)

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48 Hrs. (1982) – The birth of a Genre

After having directed 5 films by the beginning of the 80’s, Walter Hill was in need of a real hit. Sure, his films had gathered some nice critical response, and a few of them had made profit and “The Long Riders” was even nominated for Palme d’Or in the 1980 Cannes Film Festival. But his following film, the 1981 cajun actioner “Southern Comfort” was a complete box-office disaster. In Hill’s own words: “didn’t make a fucking nickel anywhere. Foreign domestic, anything… I was proud of the film… But I was disappointed in the lack of response. It was a universal audience failure… Usually you can say they loved it in Japan or something. I don’t think anybody loved it anywhere.” So, as things usually go in Hollywood, you’re only as good as your last films box-office receipts. Hill needed a film that would attract some serious audience.

Hill’s long-time producer Lawrence Gordon was actually the one who came up with the idea of “48 Hrs.“. It didn’t really resemble anything that the final movie was about, but the 48 hour timeline stuck. In Gordon’s version the Governor of Louisiana’s daughter is kidnapped by a criminal, who strapped dynamite to her head and threatened to blow her up in 48 hours if the ransom was not met. The meanest cop goes to the worst prison in the state and gets out the most vicious criminal for his knowledge of the kidnapper who was his cellmate. So – it sounds more like “Speed“, with a governor’s daughter. Roger Spottiswoode, mostly known as an editor for Sam Peckinpah and having just directed his first film “Terror Train“, was brought on board to write the first drafts of the screenplay(along with an uncredited writer Bill Kerby). Also on the writing team were Hill himself, Larry Gross Steven E. De Souza and Jeb Stuart(uncredited). Slowly the film started to resemble the story we now know, but it would still undergo some heavy changes – especially dialogue-wise – when it’s two leads were finally cast.

48-hrs

Reggie: Jack… Tell me a story.
Jack: Fuck you!
Reggie: Oh, that’s one of my favorites.

The first two people approached to play the mismatched duo of a cop and a crook were Clint Eastwood and Richard Pryor. Might’ve been an interesting team indeed, but Eastwood rejected the offer – saying that he wanted to play a villain instead – and it’s pretty understandable as Eastwood had already played a tough San Fransisco cop on several “Dirty Harry“-movies. And went on to do “Escape from Alcatraz“(1979). So the development of “48 hrs.” went into a two-year limbo. At that time, a young stand-up comedian by the name of Eddie Murphy had become a regular in “Saturday Night Live” and everybody wanted to take some of that foul-mouthed, witty energy that he possessed and bottle it. A deal was made, and Murphy was set to make his feature film debut with one little catch: he could only start shooting the film a couple weeks later than the rest of the crew as he had to finish his SNL duties first. Murphy also requested that his character’s original name, Willie Biggs, was changed into something that is not “so stereotypical” – so the imprisoned, fast-talking street crook was named Reggie Hammond. After actors such as Jeff Bridges, Mickey Rourke and Kris Kristofferson passed on the role, it was Nick Nolte – suggested by Lawrence Gordon – who ended up being cast as the tough San Fransisco detective Jack Cates. Due to the improvisational nature of Murphy and the chemistry between him and Nolte, the screenplay ended up being re-written, by Hill’s account “right to the very last day of shooting“.

Among other “firsts”, a young and ambitious Joel Silver – previously only acting as co-, associate- and executive producer – finally got his first full “Producer”-credit. And he and Lawrence Gordon would go on to do many things together in the following years.

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THE FILM:

Convicted criminal Albert Ganz(James Remar, returning Hill regular from “The Warriors” and “The Long Riders“) escapes from working detail with the help of his partner-in-crime, Billy Bear(Sonny Landham), murdering two guards in the process. They set their way to San Francisco, where they murder a man named Henry Wong, assault another member of their old gang, Luther(David Patrick Kelly, playing a character named ‘Luther’ for a second time in a Walter Hill film – the first of course being in “The Warriors“), kidnap his girlfriend and tell him they will be holding her until “he can get the money”. and then settle into a hotel – calling up some female companions. Jack Cates – a disheveled, slightly boozing cop – wakes up, has a slight argument with his girlfriend Elaine(Annette O’Toole) and leaves for work. He joins two fellow detectives who have answered a call of a stolen credit card being used in a hotel. As Jack stays to guard the lobby, the two detectives are ambushed upstairs by the criminals, who are revealed to be Ganz and Billy. In a standoff at the lobby, Jack is forced to give his gun to Ganz as Billy is holding the surviving detective, Algren(Jonathan Banks, lately of “Breaking Bad“-fame) at gunpoint. Ganz shoots Algren with Jack’s gun, just nearly misses Jack and escapes with Billy. Furious, Jack wants some payback and convinces his boss, Captain Haden(Frank McRae, creating the ultimate prototype of the “angry” police captain), to let him chase down Ganz and his accomplice by any means necessary. He goes through the records of Ganz’ known associates – makes the connection of Henry Wong being one of them and finds the next name on the list: Reggie Hammond, serving a 3 year sentence of armed robbery. Jack manages to talk Reggie into helping him find Ganz, and forges a two day leave(the titular 48 hours) for Reggie – making it the deadline in which Ganz must be caught(dead or alive). Reggie has as much to lose with Ganz being roaming free as Jack, we later find out.

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Looking for leads, the first stop for Jack & Reggie is Luther who fires some shots at Jack and tries to escape but is subdued by Reggie – with a well-placed opening of a car door. Not getting anything out of Luther – who’s fearing for his girlfriend’s life – Jack throws him in jail and the bickering team goes for the next lead; a bar where Billy Bear used to work. The bar is a country/western bar called “Torchy’s”(this bar name pops up in Hill’s filmography several times) which is, to put it politely, full of rednecks. Reggie, saying to Jack that he could do this “detective bullshit” just as well as him makes a bet with Jack; if he can get some lead from this bar, Jack must give him half an hour with a woman. Jack – beginning to suspect that Reggie has some ulterior motives to catch Ganz – agrees, but if Reggie loses the bet he has to come clean about the whole story. Armed with Jack’s badge(and his own mouth), Reggie proceeds to bully and subdue the entire bar full of rednecks(this has been widely regarded as “the scene that made Eddie Murphy a superstar”) and he DOES get an address for Billy’s former girlfriend who lives down the street, in the edge of Chinatown. But it turns out to be a dead end and Jack & Reggie only manage to get threatened at gunpoint and swung at by a baseball bat by Billy’s former girl and her roommate. Frustrated with the case going nowhere, Jack engages in a fistfight with Reggie and neither one backing down, they both beat each other bloody – only to be interfered by a police patrol. Finally Reggie decides to come clean; Ganz is after a loot of $500, 000 which he, Reggie and the others robbed from a drug dealer and is now hidden in Reggie’s car that has sat inside a parking garage for 3 years.

48hrs

As they stakeout the garage, they see Luther walking in the next morning and driving away with Reggie’s car. They follow him to a subway station where the exchange of money for Luther’s girlfriend is supposed to happen. But Ganz spots Jack in the crowd and Billy shoots a policeman who stumbles on the scene. In the following chaos Jack tries to catch Ganz and Billy who escape in a subway, while Reggie follows Luther and the money. He calls Jack to meet him outside the hotel where Luther is hiding in and the two make up. Jack even agrees to lend Reggie some money so he can get a room in the hotel with a girl he’s just met, but as soon as Reggie and the girl step out, Luther leaves and boards a bus. The bus is stolen and driven by Billy, while Ganz sits inside with Luther’s girl. Angered by a comment by Luther, Ganz shoots him down, just as Jack and Reggie appear next to the bus. A wild shootout and chase later, Jack’s car gets pushed into the front of a car dealership and the bad guys get away. Haden chews Jack a new asshole for causing property damage as well as forging Reggie’s two-day “leave”, ordering Jack to return Reggie back to jail immediately. The two decide to have one last drink at a bar when they come to a wild goose chase-conclusion that Ganz & Billy might actually hide in the Chinatown apartment, as the abandoned bus was found nearby. A final standoff in the shadowy alleys of Chinatown commences…

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THE CONCLUSION:

48 Hrs.” started a lot of things. First off – after it’s December premiere in 1982 it grossed $78,868,508 at the domestic box office, becoming the seventh highest-grossing film of that year – and as such, becoming the highest-grossing film of Walter Hill’s career. Another thing that this film’s success started, was what could be called Joel Silver’s “golden era” – a string of high-concept action movies; “Commando“(1985), “Lethal Weapon“(1987), “Predator“(1987), “Die Hard“(1988) and several sequels to all of the forementioned movies. For about ten years or so, Silver could do no wrong – and even some of the not so successful pictures from that period, like “Action Jackson“(1988), “Road House“(1989), “The Adventures of Ford Fairlane“(1990), “Ricochet“(1991) and “The Last Boy Scout“(1991) have later gained a certain cult following among the action aficionados like this author – and many others, I’m sure. Also, several actors from this film would pop up in several of Silver’s productions later on, like Sonny Landham and David Patrick Kelly.

48 Hrs.” has also been marked as the first film in the “buddy cop” genre, although only one of the lead characters is an actual cop. But in it’s wake began the trend of the humorous action movies that starred a mismatched pair of characters that would start out as dysfunctional but would develop a bond during the course of the film – usually in dealing with several “life and death”-scenarios that would entail gunfire, carnage and lots of vehicular and property damage – and end up as friends by the time of the end credits. Several of the Joel Silver-productions I mentioned before follow this formula, but there have been others too; “Beverly Hills Cop“(1984), “Midnight Run“(1988), “The Hard Way“(1991), “Rush Hour“(1998), “The Rock“(1995), “2 Guns“(2013)….the genre of the “buddy movie” has continued strong up until today and will probably go on to the unforeseen future.

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Reggie: You start running a respectable business and I won’t have to come in here and hassle you every night. You know what I mean? [to the bar patrons] And I want the rest of you cowboys to know something, there’s a new sheriff in town. And his name is Reggie Hammond. So y’all be cool. Right on.

But the major thing that “48 Hrs.” started was of course Eddie Murphy. He turned from a TV-star into a major motion picture superstar pretty much overnight. And it’s so easy to see why; he single-handedly steals the entire movie from Nolte. You take a look at any scene that Murphy’s in and you see a certain kind of fire in his eyes – he knows that this is his big break and he’s going to do whatever he can to make the best of it. There’s a hunger in those eyes. And it fits extremely well to the character of Reggie, as he ALSO knows that this is his one big break to get rid of his insane former partner in crime and secure his money. You could say that it’s pretty much impossible to say where Eddie Murphy ends and Reggie Hammond begins – Murphy IS Hammond. And the critics certainly noticed his performance too. His role was considered in one instance “one of the most sensational debuts in screen history since Lauren Bacall’s in ‘To Have and Have Not‘(1944)” and he ended up being nominated for a Golden Globe-award for “New Star of the Year – Male”-category, but lost to Ben Kingsley for “Gandhi“. Murphy’s star skyrocketed with the following years’ “Trading Places” and “Beverly Hills Cop” – some would say that he got too big too fast, as his subsequent career has shown. And that hunger has sadly disappeared from his eyes a long time ago. But for that short period in the 80’s-early 90’s it was magic. And it all began here, with “48 Hrs.“.

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The story of “48 Hrs.” is not rocket science – it’s a pretty simple chase movie in it’s heart. As Hill likes to compare most of his movies to westerns, it sort of abides to this one as well – it’s your basic “tough marshall and his delinquent partner track down criminals”-premise, seen in many a western but only this time in an urban setting. Actually not that different from Hill’s “The Driver“(1978) – which was mostly played from the criminal’s side of things. And Nick Nolte’s Jack Cates is VERY much cut from the same cloth as Bruce Dern’s Detective was in that film. Both are tough, both are willing to bend any which rule to get their man. I guess the only difference is that Jack Cates actually has a girlfriend – well, sorta; it’s not exactly described as a harmonic relationship as Annette O’Toole only appears in 3 scenes and in the first she’s arguing with Nolte in the morning after waking up and in the subsequent two she’s arguing with Nolte on the phone… a cop’s life is a lonely life. Nolte’s film career also got a significant boost from the success of “48 Hrs.“, as before it he was mostly known from an acclaimed TV-miniseries “Rich Man, Poor Man” and a few lead parts in films like “The Deep“(1977), “Who’ll Stop the Rain“(1978) and “North Dallas Forty“(1979).

If there is one minor flaw in the movie, it’s that while the focus is so much on the two leads, the villains of the piece become pretty one-dimensional. But James Remar and Sonny Landham certainly make a naturally imposing team; Remar brings to play his naturally menacing and unpredictable persona(which he so successfully brought to the character of Ajax in “The Warriors“) and Landham – with his 6 ft 3, 200-pound frame – just looks scary without even doing much(and as anyone who has seen some “making of”-material from “Predator” knows, Landham was considered a somewhat dangerous man both on-screen and off-screen). It’s sometimes a risk with these types of movies; when the “good guys” have a good chemistry and just chew up the scenery, the villains don’t have enough time to be developed. I most certainly would’ve liked to have seen more scenes with these guys.

Great dialogue(in the case of Nolte/Murphy mostly improvised), great action, humor and skilled direction by Hill – that’s what is “48 Hrs.“, a film that started many things and it’s legacy continues even now; whenever there’s a mismatched pair of heroes chasing after criminals and bonding in the process(sometimes bonding while beating the shit out of each other) it’s good to remember: it began right here. And based on my recent re-watch, it has withstood the test of time and is as relevant as it’s ever been.

(Author’s note: the old DVD-release by Paramount is of piss-poor unanamorphic quality – seek the Blu-Ray or another HD source for the best viewing pleasure)

“Can You Dig It?!!?” will return.

Previous episodes:
1. “Streets of Fire”
2. “The Warriors”
3. “Last Man Standing”
4. “The Driver”
5. “The Long Riders”

Author Image

I Am Better

Coming from the frozen wastelands of Finnish tundra. Mr. Better seeks warmth from his television & home theater and all the wonders they provide. He occasionally dabbles in the arts of drawing and photography.

  • Great write-up! The German dub is sadly only so-so. That was from a time when Joel Silver could do no wrong.

  • KilliK

    Southern Comfort is great. the only thing missing was having someone squeal like a pig.
    and isnt 48Hrs the progenitor of the buddy cop genre?

  • KilliK

    the movie has two other great character actors, Brion James (RIP) and David Patrick Kelly. also, wasnt the whole sequence with Eddie Murphy pretending to be a cop in the redneck bar, a full improvisation by him?

    ps. I am surprised they havent remade this yet. maybe they ll do it as all-girl buddy cop movie, if the Ghostbusters remake is a hit.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Great write up, IAB. Mainframe working overtime on this one? I love 48 Hours. Another movie, that if made today, half the dialogue would be cut out. I actually think Nolte holds his own with Murphy here. Anyone that just thinks Murphy is a comedian, check this film out. Love the hardcore violence in this one. Frank McRae is a fucking blast in this.

  • KilliK

    when you say Murphy was a tv-star prior to his 48Hrs role, what do you mean? I dont remember him playing in a tv show and his IMDB page doesnt bring up anything relative.

  • Stalkeye

    Fucking excellent write up for an excellent Movie! 48 Hours was another Movie that made the 80’s so fucking cool! A Buddy Cop formula with the two protagonists dislike of one another only to take on a common foe was unheard of prior to this Movie.

    48 Hours also set the precedent for Miami Vice as well. Murphy of course, stole the show especially during the Bar scene. I fucking love it!!!

  • The last I checked, “Saturday Night Live” was a television show.

  • “Never seen so many backwards ass country fucks in my life…”
    XD

  • It is the progenitor. That’s what I meant by “birth of a genre”

  • Stalkeye

    Gets me every time. *wink*

  • KilliK

    he wasnt a permament member of the cast, he only did 3 episodes.

  • KilliK

    “that made the 80’s so fucking cool”

    uh-oh. you said the word 80s. be careful and dont flush your toilet 3 times for the next hour, otherwise He’ll appear here.

  • “…Murphy first earned national attention as a regular cast member on Saturday Night Live (SNL) from 1980 to 1984 , and was credited with helping to revitalize the show during the early 1980s….”

    I write ’em as I reads them

  • “he” is in Sweden right now.

  • KilliK

    but Imdb says he was only in 3 episodes in 3 years..

  • KilliK

    poor Swedish people..

  • Mighty strange, as my imdb shows 66 episodes. (refresh for pic)
    Couldn’t even fit them all on one screen.

  • KilliK

    he was in those episodes only as a writer.

  • Actor – 66 episodes
    Writer – 39 episodes

    That’s what the internet says, so it is the truth set in stone.

  • KilliK

    those were after 48 came out.

  • Abe

    There was a lot of craziness about Murphy on SNL. Lorne Michaels left the same time Murphy was hired. The new show runner thought Robert Townsend would be the “black guy on the show.” (Actual quote) Then Ebersol was brought on to fix SNL. He loved Murphy and put him front and center. Later, Murphy was signed to a contract that only made him appear in 10 episodes and he was allowed to pre-tape his segments.

  • I have no knowledge of SNL other than what I read from Google. Thanks for clearing this up.

  • Tarmac492.1

    He was only in 10 episodes? That doesnt sound correct.

  • Tarmac492.1

    that doesnt seem right. I remember him being on more than 3 or ten. Although 80 to 84 I was 8 to 12. I prob started watching it mostly at 10 or so. Time changes things for you. It just seems like a very low number.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Kill my landlord.

  • Stalkeye

    So by that statement, you’re equating me mentioning “80’s so fucking cool” like saying “Candyman” Five times? 😛

  • Stalkeye

    XD You’re bad, you know that?

  • Tarmac492.1

    Remar and Landham were badass in this. Truly frightening criminals. I kind of like that they were a little one dimensional–that kept them almost like forces of evil.

  • Stalkeye

    Then there’s this…

  • Tarmac492.1

    The scene when McRae is crucifying the two of them and you see Nolte defend Murphy was a subtle touch that showed that Murphy had rightfully earned his respect. Great acting. FUCK YOU, CONVICT!!!!

  • Tarmac492.1

    You think he could get away with this today?

  • Tarmac492.1

    I dont like white people and I hate rednecks. You people are rednecks.
    Your too stupid to have a fucking job.
    Great stuff in that scene.

  • Tarmac492.1

    CHess King made the 80s so cool.

  • Full Frontal Throttle

    Love this film. Snuck into it as a lad.

  • Full Frontal Throttle

    Love the Cowgirl dancing

  • Full Frontal Throttle

    Let’s see what we can fuck with next

  • Yeah. I just wish there had been a bit more stuff with them. Basically the only character moment for Remar is him watching a “Space Kid”-cartoon really intensely.

  • Full Frontal Throttle

    It lies

  • Abe

    He was only in ten episodes the last year of his run.

  • Stalkeye

    Tar, Frank McRae was the guy that played Jack’s friend-Detective Algren who was gunned down by Ganz. But I forgot the black actor who was Cates’ Boss. LMMFAO@”That’s right i called him a N*99er”! (WTF!!) Shit just got real when the Boss tore them both a new Asshole.

  • Tarmac492.1

    That was a cool scene. Cartoons in movies creep me out for some reason.

  • Tarmac492.1

    classic.

  • Tarmac492.1

    actually, Banks had a very well acted death scene

  • Tarmac492.1

    Agreed. One of the best cop movies ever. Awful, awful sequel.

  • Stalkeye

    Redneck 1: “This is our place, Nigger”

    Reggie: “Oh what are you, some backwoods Country-Ass faggot”?

    *Redneck 1 Takes a swing only to get his ass handed to him*

    Redneck 2: “What kind of Cop are you”?

    Reggie: “You know what I am? I’m your worst fuckin’ nightmare, man. I’m a nigger with a badge which means I got permission to kick your fuckin’ ass whenever I feel like it!”

    Cates: “Let me explain one thing to you, nigger: I fight DIRTY!”

    Nah, you can’t make Films like that in an over politically sensitive world such as this nowadays. /:

  • Stalkeye

    Aw, hell naw!!

  • Stalkeye

    Yeah, I over analyzed the Hell outta that scene. Was Ganz out of it altogether or just appreciated Television after being in the Pokey so quite some time? Bro, you’re convincing me to re-watch this Bitch again.
    Classic 80’s Film and IMO still better than Trading Places.

    Hopefully, Dan and Abro will have Remar back to discuss 48 Hours in depth.And ask him about his take on said scene.

  • Bop

    I love Another 48 Hours, but I really need to rewatch this one.

    Awesome article, IAB. Didn’t realize Joel Silver was involved in so many movies I like.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Great dialogue. As disdainful as the language is it is realistic. I got no problem with such language as long as it is in context of character.

  • Bop

    The voice of Eddie Murphy is really funny in German if you ask me.

  • But very different from the English one.

  • Bop

    I keep wondering where Murphy went wrong. That guy seemed to have it all.

  • Bop

    Reggie Hammond is such a cool name.

  • Abro? That’s a cool new name 🙂

  • Bop

    Oh, definitely.

  • Stalkeye

    Thanx! Actually, I nicknamed him that awhile ago. Methinks he approves it. (;’

  • Stalkeye

    Well, it’s a classic case of Thou protest too much. he made a habit of making one too many Gay Jokes only for him to get caught with a Tranny.
    I guess the Jokes on him.

  • Stalkeye

    Exactly, Tar. It’s a matter of realism and not offensive for offensive’s sake.
    That’s why i can’t take series such as Empire seriously. it would have been better had they aired the show on FX if not HBO, Starz or Showtime.

  • Stalkeye

    Aww, Fuck! I remeber watching a Sci Fi series back in the day and it had this actor’s face above the name “Frank McRae”. Apologies Tar, my bad.

  • Stalkeye

    Thought he looked familiar.

  • Banks played a character named Frank McPike in “Wiseguy” TV series back in the day, that I remember.

  • belly up ping-pong Pequod

    Excellent!

  • Tarmac492.1

    No worries–he was still a fucking hoot ripping into those two, Hilarious. Must have given himself laryngitis.

  • Tarmac492.1

    Murphy’s best film in my opinion. Wish that mofo would do some more like this. He is still a young dude. Would love to see him in a Tarantino or Refn flick. Somebody that appreciates who he is, but make him do something new.

  • And he parodied that role in both”Last Action Hero” and “Loaded Weapon 1”

  • It’s interesting to watch the first movie knowing that in the sequel it was revealed that Brion James’ character actually was the drug deaver they stole the money from.

  • Tim R.R. Something

    Great film, great article!

  • KilliK

    also there is the irony that in the original, it was one of the rare times when he was a good guy, but the sequel negated that and turned him into a villain.

  • Thanks, Tim. Another Walter Hill-article was long overdue.

  • KilliK

    the sequel was good, I dont understand the hate it is receiving.

  • KilliK

    why?

  • KilliK

    with BHC3, when he decided to become an action star.

  • KilliK

    since I was a kid..

  • I was thinking about covering both films, but I’ll save “another…” for the 1990-series.

  • I think THIS was the first film I saw him in: http://i.imgur.com/jXxe4mi.jpg

  • KilliK

    oh, and dont forget Horner wrote the score of the movie, which he also used as the basis for his Commando score.

  • His “steel drum” phase.

  • Thanks, Bells.

  • The Golden Years.

  • Stalkeye

    That’s an understatement, Boyo.

  • Stalkeye

    Damn, forgot about that. The steel percussion used in 48 hours was an obvious sign of other things to come.
    Talented fucker who shall be missed. (Same goes for Iwata.)

  • Stalkeye

    Hmmm, what’s the next one? (;’

  • Still thinking.

  • Stalkeye

    That’s the only thing i liked from Another 48 Hours. The sequel was just another rehash of the first. Kinda like…

    http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51QK24REW7L.jpg

  • Stalkeye

    He was great in Southern Comfort.
    “Y’all don’t Fuck wit us”!
    RIP Brion indeed. Very underrated actor.

  • Phillyflopper

    It’s funny, I was watching Clear And Present Danger once and heard a bit of steel drum in it. Then I later found out that was James Horner too. That drum gets around. xD

  • Phillyflopper

    Who is that in the avatar? She looks familiar. Hmm…

  • Full Frontal Throttle

    Sadly, yep

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Great stuff.

    Remember when Murphy was actually edgy and dangerous? The redneck bar scene is classic, and elevates this movie beyond a simple action/buddy cop effort. There’s no way they’d get away with some of the slurs used in this movie today, either.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Candyman?

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    That’s what he told you. In truth, he bought a ticket to the US and is currently trying to sneak onto the set of Star Trek Beyond. He even has hopes of getting JJ’s autograph (if he’s visiting the set that day in his capacity as producer) and, possibly, Uwhora’s, too.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    http://thesupernaughts.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/10899658_10203142114701493_192500605_n-223×300.jpg

    “You rang, M’Lord?”

    Just imagine that face staring behind you in the bathroom mirror. LOL.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Murphy was in several seasons of SNL and was a regular, I think. He was featured in a lot more than three episodes, anyway.

    IMDB contains a lot of inaccurate credits, especially when it comes to TV material.

  • KilliK

    LOOOOOL

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Seems about right.

  • KilliK

    yeah, he played in more than 3 episodes.
    I checked Imdb again and I noticed that his SNL credits as an actor, are chronologically after 48Hrs, although he was in SNL before the movie came out. I entirely missed those and I am ashamed of it.

  • KilliK

    yeah, Imdb has those credits too, above his 48Hrs though he was in the show before the movie. you were right, and I was wrong. I am sorry for wasting your time over this.

  • Tarmac492.1

    It just really bored me. It kind of seemed a complete rehash of the first one and the leads didnt seem like they wanted to be there.The Iceman reveal was kind of cool. I did love the stunt when the guy gets blown out the window and lands on the water truck. Amazing camera work.

  • Research is never a time wasted. No problems

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Apparently, the sequel was trimmed of almost a full hour of footage, and a lot of comedy and action sequences were cut at the last minute. Would it have made the movie any better? Who knows, but it would have been fun to see.

    I wonder where Gabriel Gray is these days? He used to write a lot of interesting articles about these “lost” versions of movies.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    Well, don’t feel bad about it.

    Yeah, for TV shows, IMDB always orders the credit by an actor’s final year of appearance in a show, not by the year they started.

  • KilliK

    you’re right, didnt know that. it makes sense.

  • Let the man have his vacation, he is not here.

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    It’s just a bit of fun. Asi would appreciate it and find it all a good laugh.

    …Actually, no; on second thought, he wouldn’t. He has absolutely no discernible sense of humor, whatsoever.

  • [email protected] is mostly in the Twitterverse nowadays

  • Stalkeye

    I have two in mind.
    *Evil grin*

  • Stalkeye

    I do.

  • Stalkeye

    Last I heard, He was “Faux” Willard as the rumor goes.

  • KilliK

    what’s the reason?

  • Stalkeye

    LMMFAO Instead of getting hacked and slashed with a Meathook, I’ll get a long winded lecture on how horrible the *0’s were and my love for that Decade was mostly for nostalgic reasons.

    Ah, I keed Asi…………well, sorta. (;’

  • Stalkeye

    He does have a sense of humor and that’s what really caught my eye back in the AICN days. However, I just think he gets a lil defensive at times or some of his humor can be misconstrue as off putting.
    He’s cool ppl regardless of our differences from time to time.

  • Stalkeye

    Read my previous comment from yesterday.

  • KilliK

    which one?

  • Turd Has Escaped The Gravy

    His “sense of humor” is, shall we say…selective.

  • Loomis Simmons

    First rate!

    Don’t mean to nitpick – the movie certainly popularized the genre but did not birth it (Hickey & Boggs, Busting and Freebie and the Bean).

    Fun fact: Nolte was to host SNL the Saturday after the movie opened. He was too hung over from partying at Studio 54 and Murphy ended up hosting – – the rest of the cast was none too pleased.

  • Sagamanus

    A middle finger in the poster. Wow that’s strange for the era…or maybe it isn’t and I just remember it differently.

  • It was edited out in some posters.

  • Sagamanus

    This is one of the first films I rented on Beta. Yes I had one of those and not a VHS as I was under the impression it was a superior machine, which it was. The choices were limited at least for a long time. But this was available. I think I watched it several times before it had to go back. Also the time you could hold on to a film back then was short so you had to take it back quick. And we had limited transportation. It was inconvenient to say the least.

  • Sagamanus

    Nick Nolte to me has always been the sane Gary Busey. And yes I have confused the two many a time.

  • Sagamanus

    Red Heat was an International 48 Hours. It has its moments but how many times can one do that set-up? Nvm. A million that’s how. Now we need one with a robot. Nvm.

  • They might confuse even each other these days

  • Sagamanus

    Landham is widely considered to be a wacko in real life as well. I think ‘dangerous’ is about right, but one needs to add wacko to it.

  • Sagamanus

    Great article IAB.

  • Sagamanus

    To me I don’t think they could remake this, because the story is pretty basic with the actors being the thrust of the film. And how would it not be compared to a Lethal Weapon as that is the more popular of the two buddy cop films? Nevertheless anything is possible.

  • Sagamanus

    John McTiernan did two of those big Joel Silver vehicles and then followed it up with two more big films, then the drop off. Mark Lester directed Commando and hasn’t done anything that would keep him in the eye since. Richard Donner is also a mixed bag. I guess when you orbit a sun like Joel Silver and then his light goes out yours does as well.